Resnick Institute

our facility

Jorgensen Laboratory Building

The Earle M. Jorgensen Laboratory

The Resnick Sustainability Institute is at the heart of Caltech's energy science and technology initiatives, both as a physical home and intellectual resource. The Institute is co-located with the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis in the Jorgensen Laboratory building. The building has become the central hub for sustainable energy science and research, drawing faculty and students across campus to its cutting-edge spaces.

Formerly a computer science building, the Jorgensen lab was completely renovated under the leadership of John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects. The renovation was completed in Spring of 2012 and has achieved LEED Platinum certification. The building's key green features include:

  • Day Lighting
  • Green Roof Above Entry Pavilion
  • Neutral Dual Duct HVAC Scheme
  • High-Efficiency Lighting
  • Water Saving Fixtures: Low Flow and Dual Flush
  • High Albedo Roof Surface to Reduce Heat Gain
  • Climate Adapted Landscaping
  • Use of Rapidly Renewable, Recyclable and Regional Materials (i.e. Bamboo, cork)
  • Solar PV Array Assigned to Offset A Portion of the Building's Energy Demand

Visualizing Jorgensen

Jorgensen Lobby Rendering

The Jorgensen building was rededicated in October of 2012 and stands as a symbol of Caltech's lasting commitment to sustainability research. From the early renderings of Fall 2010, Jorgensen was depicted as an innovative space -with communal areas to support collaboration, ample meeting spaces, and state of the art laboratories.

The Green Construction Process

Jorgensen before the Renovation

The most sustainable structure you can build is the one you already have. Caltech and its partners were able to reuse or recycle over 90% of the materials removed from the original building. Everything from concrete and re-bar to even the office furniture was recycled. Not a single detail was overlooked and the construction team even placed sandbags around the perimeter of the site to keep debris out of storm drains.