Resnick Institute

Current Grad Fellows

Austin Chadwick

Austin Chadwick

Resnick Fellow

Cultivating Water Resources on River Deltas

Austin is a graduate student in geology working in Prof. Michael Lamb’s group. He earned his bachelor’s degree in geophysics at UCLA, where he conducted research in geophysical fluid dynamics and tectonic geomorphology. At Caltech, Austin studies the mechanics of river deltas using a combination of theory, laboratory experiments, and remote sensing techniques. His research focuses on the natural tendency of depositional rivers to catastrophically change course, and how the frequency and location of these events are influenced by land subsidence and flood variability. Predicting patterns of channel-switching is crucial for sustainable water resource management on densely populated river deltas. A better understanding of how rivers naturally distribute water and sediment across floodplains and wetlands will help us to recognize the long-term consequences of water infrastructure such as dams and levees, and to revise management solutions like engineered diversions.

Adviser: Michael P. Lamb

AChandru Dhandapani

Chandru Dhandapani

Resnick Fellow

Fuel Effects on Turbulent Flames to Predict Combustion Behavior of Alternative Fuels in Jet Engines

Chandru received his bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from IIT Madras. He is a graduate student in aeronautics working on computational turbulent combustion with Prof. Guillaume Blanqaurt's research group. His project combines theory and computation to develop a new framework for simulating turbulent flames. This new framework could be used to study the behavior of different fuels under turbulent combustion, and predict how sustainable alternative jet fuels would perform in aircraft engines. This prediction would help in testing alternative jet fuels quicker, with less resources, thereby finding more substitutes for conventional jet fuel.

Adviser: Guillaume Blanquart

Nicholas Dou

Nicholas Dou

Goldhirsh-Resnick First Year Fellow 2012

Nicholas received a BS in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering/computer science from MIT and enrolled at Caltech in Fall 2012 in the mechanical and civil engineering department. As an undergraduate at MIT, Nick became interested in energy generation and storage. With the Device Research Lab, he researched superhydrophobic condensation on nanostructured surfaces. Engineered surfaces provide enhanced heat transfer performance that can increase the efficiency of power plants.

Cody Finke

Cody Finke

Resnick Fellow

Harnessing Mobile Technology to Create a Wastewater Infrastructure and Sustainable Water Future in the Developing World

Cody Finke earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry with distinction at Carleton College (Northfield, MN), during which he gained research experience at Carleton, at REUs at the University of Washington and the University of Sydney, and while writing his senior integrative exercise on single molecule biophysics. While at Carleton, Cody was recognized with numerous awards including being named a Barry M. Goldwater Scholar for Excellence in Education. Cody is currently a PhD student in environmental science and engineeringing under Prof. Michael Hoffmann. Cody conducts research aimed at solving the global water crisis and optimizing green fuel sources. His current research projects are 1) Creating software as a tool to enable wastewater treatment in the developing world. 2) Understanding electrocatlysts at the active site level in order to be able to intelligently design and improve electrodes. 3) Improving infrastructure free water treatment to output water clean enough for ecosystem services and reuse.

In 2015, Cody won the Dow-SISCA Runner-up Prize along with Justin Jasper for the project, "Electrochemical+UV On-Site Wastewater Treatment" and for his software engineering work, he won the 2014 Vodafone Wireless Innovations Project competition.

Adviser: Michael R. Hoffmann

Rachel Ford

Rachel Ford

Resnick Fellow

Next Generation of Copper-based Electrode Materials for Electrochemical CO2 Reduction

Rachel is a PhD student in the chemistry department. She received her BS in chemistry from the University of Florida, where she conducted research in the Butler Polymer Research Laboratory under the advisement of Prof. Ken Wagener and Prof. Ken Sloan. Her research focused on the application of polymer chemistry to enhance sunscreen stability and efficacy. At Caltech, Rachel seeks to develop novel copper-containing polymeric films for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to produce liquid fuels and useful chemicals.

Advisers: Julie A. Kornfield and Mamadou S. Diallo

Jinglin Huang

Jinglin Huang

Resnick Fellow

Investigating the Potential Applications of Carbon Nanotubes in Seawater Desalination

Jinglin is a graduate student in medical engineering. She holds a BS in engineering science from Smith College, with a minor in music. As an undergrad, Jinglin conducted research in biofilm formation, protein-based brain therapeutics modeling, and crystallization process optimization. She joined Dr. Gharib’s lab in 2015 and worked on fabricating carbon nanotube based micro-needles for painless drug delivery. Currently, Jinglin is investigating carbon nanotube fabricated superhydrophobic material for applications in seawater desalination. If successful, this could pave the way for the design of a more efficient, more sustainable, and low energy consumption solar desalination system with continuous operation.

Adviser: Morteza Gharib

Vatsal Jhalani

Vatsal Jhalani

Resnick Fellow

Carrier Dynamics in Materials for Efficient Lighting from First Principles

Vatsal received a BSc in engineering physics at UC Berkeley in 2013. His undergraduate research experience was focused on theory and simulation of x-ray free electron lasers, performing research at Livermore, Stanford, and Japan. He joined Caltech applied physics and the Bernardi group in the fall of 2014. Vatsal is interested in theoretical condensed matter physics and ab initio studies of material properties. His research focuses on the development and application of first principles calculations to investigate microscopic carrier dynamics and light emission in materials critical for LED technology. His research aims to provide new microscopic insights to ultimately guide the engineering of more efficient lighting devices, and provide a framework which can be transferrable to compute carrier dynamics in other photovoltaic and semiconductor materials for sustainable technologies, such as solar cell, photoelectrocatalytic devices, and power electronics.

Adviser: Marco Bernardi

Sebastian Lee

Sebastian Lee

Resnick Fellow

Quantum Embedding Methods for the Better Design of Liquid Electrolytes in Lithium-ion Batteries

Sebastian is a graduate student in chemistry working in Prof. Thomas Miller’s group. He received a BS in chemistry/biochemistry and a minor in physics from UC Santa Barbara (UCSB). As an undergraduate, he developed his passion for theoretical chemistry under the tutelage of Prof. Bernie Kirtman at UCSB and Prof. Henry Schaefer at the University of Georgia. At Caltech, he applies and develops theoretical methods to computationally guide the better design of liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. His research aims to address the growing need for safer and higher performing batteries so they may be used in high energy content applications, such as electric vehicles.

Adviser: Thomas F. Miller

Ben Matson

Ben Matson

Resnick Fellow

Reducing Alternative Substrates in a Sea of Protons: The Role of Lewis Acids in the Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide, Nitrite and Nitrate

Ben is a graduate student in bhemistry. He received his BS in chemistry from the University of Washington, where his research focused on the electrocatalytic reduction of dioxygen using iron porphyrins. At Caltech, Ben studies the role of secondary interactions in the binding and reduction of carbon dioxide, nitrate and nitrite. Specifically, Ben is interested in the synthesis and study of bimetallic complexes for use as molecular electrocatalysts and photocatalyts. Understanding the interactions that lead to selective reduction of more complex substrates in the presence of protons will aid in the development of improved catalysts for the conversion of carbon dioxide to liquid fuels.

Adviser: Jonas C. Peters

Jaeyun Moon

Jaeyun Moon

Resnick Fellow

Exceptionally Low Thermal Conductivity Glasses for Energy-Efficient Windows

Jaeyun received his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech, where he did research in thermal transport in carbon fibers with President. G. P. “Bud” Peterson and in water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells with Professor Tequila Harris. He is currently a graduate student in mechanical engineering in Professor Austin Minnich’s group where he studies the thermal transport in amorphous materials using both numerical and experimental techniques. Specifically, he is interested in finding out how heat carriers (propagons, diffusons, and locons) transport heat differently in amorphous materials from phonons in crystals. Understanding heat transfer mechanisms in amorphous materials will enable us to synthesize novel materials with exceptionally low thermal conductivity.

Adviser: Austin J. Minnich

John Naviaux

John Naviaux

Resnick First Year Fellow 2014

John is a graduate student in environmental science and engineering. He received a BS in environmental science and a BA in business economics from UC Irvine. John worked on a variety of projects while in Irvine that included the economics of urban bus pollution, time at the Large Hadron Collider studying graviton decay, and electrode design in microbial fuel cells. John recently returned from a year abroad in Norway on a Fulbright scholarship studying arctic mercury pollution. While at Caltech, he plans to draw on his diverse background to develop fuel cell technologies and to increase their availability and affordability globally.

Adviser: Jess F. Adkins

David Needell

David Robert Needell

Zeller-Resnick First Year Fellow 2015

David received his BA in physics and applied mathematics with a minor in computer science from Bowdoin College and begins work toward a PhD in materials science at Caltech Fall 2015. As an undergraduate at Bowdoin, David focused his research toward novel solar cell designs including Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC’s), multi-junction photovoltaics, and biohybrid solid-state solar cells. Collaborating with the Cliffel Group from Vanderbilt University, David investigated solar cells whose photoactive agent consisted of Photosystem I – a fundamental protein to the initialization of photosynthesis. David is particularly excited to explore photovoltaic designs such as Silicon Microwire Solar Cells and Spectrum-Splitting Photovoltaic Modules.

Adviser: Harry A. Atwater

Christopher J. Reed

Christopher J. Reed

Resnick Fellow

Multinuclear Synthetic Models of the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II to Understand the Effects of Multiple Metal Centers on the Reactivity of a Terminal Metal-oxo

Chris is a PhD candidate in the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. He received his BS in chemistry and biochemistry at Idaho State University. At Caltech, Chris studies synthetic models of biological active sites that catalyze chemical transformations of small molecules relevant to sustainability. He synthesizes these well-defined clusters to examine how the interaction between multiple metal sites affects the physical properties and reactivity of the complex. Understanding how these synthetic clusters work is expected to aid in the design of efficient oxidation catalysts composed of earth-abundant transition metals for fuel cells.

Adviser: Theodor Agapie

Xiaoqi Ren

Xiaoqi Ren

Resnick Fellow

Markets and Algorithms for Data Center Demand Response

Xiaoqi is a PhD candidate in computer science. She received her BS in automation at Tsinghua University, China. At Caltech, her research focuses on optimization of today's large scale data centers, including scheduling, energy usage and sustainability, and market design. A major focus of her work is developing algorithms and markets to encourage participation of data centers in demand response programs, allowing large scale data centers to serve as virtual energy storage for the grid.

Adviser: Adam Wierman

Michelle Sherrott

Michelle Sherrott

Resnick Fellow

Towards Ultralight High Efficiency Solar Cells Using 2+1D Materials and Architectures

Michelle is a PhD candidate in materials science from Vancouver, Canada. She obtained her bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Pennsylvania in materials science and engineering in 2012. Her undergraduate research focused on computational methods to design silver nanowire networks for applications as flexible transparent conductors. She is now interested in the new physics that can be explored in two-dimensional materials. Specifically, she will be investigating the applicability of monolayer semiconductors to ultralight solar cell devices, and ways to improve their absorption and efficiency through unique “2+1D” geometries.

Adviser: Harry A. Atwater

Research Highlight
Armeen Taeb

Armeen Taeb

Resnick Fellow

Building Richer Water Resource Models by Characterizing Unmodeled Phenomena

Armeen received his BS in applied mathematics and electrical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder. His PhD research focuses on developing statistical models that account for the presence and effect of latent variables (unobserved phenomena) in observational data. A major focus of his work is to use these modeling frameworks to obtain a better understanding of variables influencing California water storage levels and characterize the behavior of water storage levels under changes to these variables. He hopes that his work could serve as a useful tool for making informative water sustainability policies.

Adviser: Venkat Chandrasekaran

Ying Shi Teh

Ying Shi Teh

Resnick Fellow

Density Functional Theory Development and Analysis on Defects in Perovskite Solar Cells

Ying Shi is a graduate student in mechanical engineering. She completed her undergraduate degree in engineering science at the National University of Singapore. At Caltech, she focuses on studying density functional theory (DFT) as a first-principles approach to defect study in perovskite solar cells. She is interested in exploring the interactions of defect states in perovskite materials and their effects on photovoltaic performance. This could serve as guidance on systematically improving the efficiency of solar cells, hence bringing us one step closer to developing an efficient and low-cost solution for renewable energy.

Adviser: Kaushik Bhattacharya

Niklas Thompson

Niklas Thompson

Dow-Resnick Fellow

Toward Sustainable Nitrogen Fixation: Elucidating the Mechanism of Nitrogen Reduction by Molecular Catalysts

Niklas is a graduate student in chemistry. As an undergraduate at the University of Chicago he studied chemistry and mathematics, earning Bachelor of Science degrees in both fields. At Chicago, Niklas investigated the coordination chemistry of palladium with bulky N-heterocyclic carbene ligands in the Hillhouse group, with the aim of stabilizing unusual bonding motifs relevant to catalysis. At Caltech, Niklas researches the mechanism of the fixation of dinitrogen to ammonia catalyzed by iron complexes. The fixation of nitrogen is a process essential to all life, and is currently practiced on an enormous scale industrially. Understanding how to catalyze this reaction under mild conditions with earth-abundant materials constitutes an important step in developing a sustainable method for the synthesis of ammonia for the purpose of fertilizer production.

In 2015, Niklas won the Dow-SISCA Grand Prize along with Trevor Del Castillo for the project, "Toward Sustainable Nitrogen Fixation: Developing Fe-catalysts for Direct N2 to NH3 Conversion".

Adviser: Jonas C. Peters

Research Highlight
Simon Todtli

Simon Todtli

Cross-Resnick First Year Fellow 2015

Simon did his undergraduate work in mechanical engineering at ETH Zurich and will pursue his graduate studies in aeronautics at Caltech. For his undergraduate thesis, he worked on the production of bulk chemicals from renewable resources and his master's thesis focused on the numerical simulation and control of turbulent channel flows. While at Caltech, he plans to further explore the dynamics and control of wall-bounded turbulent flows, with the ultimate goal of reducing drag on engineering surfaces such as ships or pipes. Advances in this field would offer the opportunity for vast energetic savings in the transport sector and thus help to reduce the ecological footprint of today's globalized economy.

Adviser: Beverley J. McKeon

Kevin Vu

Kevin Vu

Zeller-Resnick First Year Fellow 2016

Kevin is a graduate student in environmental science and engineering. He received his BE in civil engineering from Macaulay Honors College at the City College of New York (CCNY). During his undergraduate career, Kevin pursued an interest in the issue of potable water. This led him to conduct research on the presence of pharmaceuticals in water, work on multiple projects in the CCNY chapter of Engineers Without Borders-USA, and contribute to water treatment research at the EPA, including a study on naturally-occurring strontium. At Caltech, Kevin is interested in developing a water treatment system capable of producing drinkable water under strict constraints.

Cora Went

Cora Went

Cross-Resnick First Year Fellow 2016

Cora is a graduate student in physics who joined Harry Atwater’s group in August 2016. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015 with a BS in physics. She participated in undergraduate research projects focused on characterizing three different materials with applications to solar cells: III-V semiconductors, charge-transfer complexes, and colloidal quantum dots. She worked for a summer at the Fraunhofer Institute in Solar Energy Systems in Freiburg, Germany, where she investigated power-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy of III-V semiconductors. In the Atwater group, she studies two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides for applications to ultrathin, high-efficiency, and low-cost solar cells.

Adviser: Harry A. Atwater

Xiaolin Xu

Xiaolin Xu

Resnick Fellow

Charge Carrier Dynamics of Perovskite Solar Cells Studied by fs-THz Spectroscopy

Xiaolin is a graduate student in materials science. She received her BS in material physics from the University of Science and Technology of China. At Caltech, Xiaolin studies charge carrier dynamics in organometallic lead halide perovskites. Specifically, she will use ultrafast spectroscopic techniques to investigate the charge-carrier recombination and mobility mechanisms in lead halide materials, followed by detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the coupling between the electron and nuclear degrees of freedom, with the goal of rationally designing pervoskite materials for solar energy conversion.

Adviser: Geoffrey A. Blake

Qin Yang

Qin "Arky" Yang

Resnick Fellow

Structure-Function Study of Two-dimensional Hybrid Perovskites for Low-Cost High-Efficiency Tandem Solar Cells

Arky is a graduate student in chemistry working in Prof. Harry Atwater's group. She earned her BS in chemistry at University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, she worked in Prof. Peidong Yang’s group on nanowire for transparent electrodes. Before that, she also did research on organic photovoltaics in Prof. He Yan’s group at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and in Prof. Gui Bazan’s group at University of California, Santa Barbara. Currently, she is interested in exploring structure-function correlations of two-dimensional perovskites (2D-PVSK), and looking for approaches to improve their quantum efficiency. This study will lay the foundation for maximizing power conversion efficiency of 2D-PVSK, and pave the way for low-cost production of high efficiency solar cells.

Adviser: Harry A. Atwater

Hao Zhao

Hao Zhao

Resnick Fellow

Analyzing California Groundwater Institutions

Hao is a graduate student in social science who enjoys talking and collaborating with people from many different disciplines. He received his BA in economics from Peking University, China and MPhil in economics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His previous research covered labor economics, economic history and institutional economics. He started working with Dr. Rosenthal in the spring of 2016 on seeking solutions to the drought problem in California. At that time, he also worked in Dr. Plott’s lab for experimental economics and political ecience. His fellowship research aims to analyze the underground water management rules across various basins in California and develop feasible strategies for sustainable and efficient water management. His work will require a thorough understanding of hydrological conditions of underground basins and engineering constraints in groundwater monitoring and transfer.

Adviser: Jean-Laurent Rosenthal